Gendering Modernism

Gendering ModernismMy review of Maria Bucur’s book, Gendering Modernism, has just been published in Times Higher Education.

In this book, we learn that the Royal Academy was established in 1768 by a group of artists, including two women, but no other female artists were admitted until 1936 and that 88 per cent of the funding for the 1913 Armory Show in New York came from female art patrons.

The book grapples with the paradox that Modernism challenged gender polarisation and misogyny, but also reinforced and amplified them.

 

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Simon Mawer, Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Bruegel the Elder

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I’ve recently published two articles.

An interview with Booker short-listed novelist, Simon Mawer, is published in my regular column for The Displaced Nation. His novel, Tightrope, set in 1950s London, won the Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction. Mawer had a peripatetic upbringing and now lives in Italy. He says that not feeling at home anywhere fires his creativity.

 

My review of a new book on the artists Hieronymus Bosch and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, has just been published in the Times Higher Education.

‘Nothing but devils, buttocks and cod-pieces,’ declared the 17th-century Spanish poet, Francisco de Quevedo, on the paintings of Bosch. In his new book, Joseph Leo Koerner writes that the delectation of Bosch’s The Garden of Delights, ‘draws us like bees to blossom’, whilst Bruegel offers us views ‘that so far exceed our capacity to look that we can never feel finished looking’.

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Pieter Bruegel the Elder, The Land of Cockaigne, circa 1567, oil on panel.

The Yorck Project: 10.000 Meisterwerke der Malerei. DVD-ROM, 2002. ISBN 3936122202. Distributed by DIRECTMEDIA Publishing GmbH., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=148469