Final rewrite

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At that satisfying stage again – ready for the final rewrite of my next novel, before sending it off to the editors at Impress Books. It is the second in a trilogy of novels on Nest ferch Rhys and the struggle between the Normans and the Welsh in the 12th century.

This new book, Conquest: The Drowned Court, concentrates on the action-packed events of Nest’s life and King Henry I’s reign between 1107 and 1121. The Flemish nun, Benedicta, took me by surprise in the writing and also plays a substantial role in this book.

The first book in the trilogy, Conquest: Daughter of the Last King is out now. This sequel will be published in the autumn. I am talking about researching and writing the Conquest series at a number of book events in Wales, London and France over the coming months. Next events:

21 April – The English Library, Villefranche-de-Rouergue

8 June – The Guildhall Library, London.

Murder Mystery in France

Villefranche-de-Rouergue_-_Place_de_la_Fontaine_-1My interview with author, Stephen Goldenberg, has just been published on The Displaced Nation website. Goldenberg has written and self-published a murder mystery set in France and thrillers set in Britain. He is now working on a novel about a man who modelled for the artist, Francis Bacon.

Stephen and I are talking about our novels at The English Library in Villefranche-de-Rouergue, France, on Friday 21 April, 5.30pm.

The English Library is a lending library for English readers with over 3,000 books. It is open on Thursday mornings and Friday afternoons and situated next to the 14th century Place de la Fontaine and the Urbain Cabrol Municipal Museum.

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Considering historical fiction

Just back from Cluny Museum of the Medieval Age, Paris.

Talking on Sat 25 Mar 10.30am at Parisot Library, France on historical fiction.

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Does historical fiction try to impose today’s moral values on another era?

7th century Visigothic votive crowns. Cluny Museum, Paris.

 

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Historical fiction takes time instead of geography as an exotic arena for exploration.

14th century aquamanile. Cluny Museum, Paris.

 

 

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One of my lead characters, a nun, uses Ovid’s rather racy love poetry as the cipher for her spy letters.

13th century censor, Limoges. Cluny Museum, Paris.

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Bodice-ripping?

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Saturday 25 March

10.30am

Tracey Warr at Parisot Library, 82160, France

Is historical fiction bodice-ripping escapism, taking liberties with historical facts, or a genre putting flesh on the skeleton of history, and engaging with contemporary society? In this event Tracey Warr will discuss a wide range of historical fiction writers from Mary Renault to Bernard Cornwell, from Ellis Peters to Sarah Dunant. She will be presenting short readings from her latest novel set in the 12th century and consider the research and inspirations for her own writing.

Followed by aperitifs at 12 noon

Tracey Warr is the author of three novels, published by Impress Books. Her stories are set in early medieval Europe. She also writes for Historical Novels Review magazine.

Part of the LibraryLit series of authors’ talks

1,000 years back and 1,000 years forward

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Some readers of my posts may feel confused by the polarised nature of my activities: on the one hand writing early medieval fiction and the other hand writing future fiction about exoplanets and other life poetics. I get quite confused by this paradox myself!

However, the medieval historian Henry of Huntingdon, writing in the 12th century, was happy to address readers in the third, fourth and fifth millennia. ‘If mortal generations are prolonged so long as that’, he said. He addressed readers 3,000 years ahead of his own time – ‘I who will be dust in your time have made mention of you in this work, such a long time before your birth’ – because he believed in history’s redemptive potential for both the present and the future. So I guess I shouldn’t worry about my own polarities too much.

For more contemplation on the topic of history and the future see Amanda Jane Hingst’s excellent book on Orderic Vitalis, The Written World, which I was delighted to just buy in the wonderful Raven Secondhand Bookshop in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

My most recent historical novel is Conquest: Daughter of the Last King (Impress Books, 2016) set in 12th century Wales, England and Normandy. I’m working on the sequel now.

Last year I published a future fiction novella, Meanda, and am now working on a new collection of future fictions inspired by aquatic flora and fauna.

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Top image by Jean Le Tavernier, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=74516

Bottom image: Algae in Iceland, Zooetics Future Fictions Summit. Photo: Nomeda Urbonas.